Mining page 2.

Heading for "The Peak" area, mostly The Jordan Family.
Heading for "The Peak" area, mostly Jordan Family.

In 1904, the path was improved to a trail so that horses could be used to help pack equipment and supplies in and ore out, but before this upgrade it was all moved on foot. Some supply trains attempted to use the practice of "raw hiding", which involved horses pulling raw bull hide with the hair side down and bags of freight on top of it over packed chutes of snow. A chain was used to brake in the snow as needed, as the path was very steep in places. In 1917 a more permanent snow trail was built with government financing, although the original pack trail was still used in the summer. Records of a pack train in 1909, owned by a Mr. Togood and Mr. Johnson from New Denver utilized twenty-five horses and twenty-five mules.

High country, Lightning Peak area.
High country, lightning Peak area.

 

F. Stevenson and W. Williams Sr. "Lightning Peak" country.
F Stevenson and W. Williams Sr. "Lightning Peak" country.
Mrs. J. O'Rielly, J. O'Rielly, Madge and Betty Colegrave, Cicil Talbot,  the cabin.
Mrs. J. O'Rielly, J. O'Rielly Madge and Betty Colegrave, Cicil Talbot,The Cabin.

In 1925, after the Vernon road was finished, a road was cut from route to the area of the Waterloo mine. The area was swampy and unstable, and a wooden road made of poles laid side to side, known as a "corduroy road", was used for long stretches to keep traffic from sinking into the mud.

Building of "The Peak" road.
Building of "The Peak" road.
Rawhiding.
Rawhiding.
Near Lightning Peak.

By the mid 1930's a car was said to be able to travel nine miles of this road, but men continued to try to improve it.
Mining had a brief return to it heyday during World War II. The Arrow Lakes and Kootenays had massive deposits of lead that had not been worth extracting for their own sake, but became valuable because of their use in munitions. The majority of the industry had moved on by this time, with most of the mines closing in the 1930's. The Waterloo operated into the 1950's, and two tons of lead concentrates and more than forty tons of zinc concentrates were shipped out of it to trail when it was cleaned and closed up in 1967.

Information unknown.
"Dictator"

"Dictator"

Lightning Peak from Penninsular Lake
Lightning Peak from Penninsular Lake.
Information unknown
Information unknown
Mt. Scaia trail.

 

 

Mt. Scaia trail.
Mt. Scaia trail.

Mount Scaia trail.

Mt. Scaia trail.